TITLE
Reference Blog

arinnhanson:

samswritingtips:

A breakdown of medieval armor, since a lot of pieces are required to create a full suit.

ref



literaryglamour:

thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:
Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.
Word Counts:
Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.
Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.
A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.
Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.
But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.
General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 
Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.
As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.
Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.
World Building:
Fantasy World Building Questionnaire
Magical World Builder’s Guide
Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
Creating Religions
Quick and Dirty World Building
World Building Links
Fantasy World Building Questions
The Seed of Government (2)
Guide to Science Fiction and Fantasy
Fantasy Worlds and Race
Water Geography
Alternate Medieval Fantasy Story
Writing Magic
Types of Magic
When Magic Goes Wrong
Magic-Like Psychic Abilities
Science and Magic
Creative Uses of Magic
Thoughts on Creating Magic Systems
Defining the Sources, Effects, and Costs of Magic
World Building Basics
Mythology Master Post
Fantasy Religions
Setting the Fantastic in the Everyday World
Making Histories
Matching Your Money to Your World
Building a Better Beast
A Man in Beast’s Clothing
Creating and Using Fictional Languages
Creating a Language
Creating Fictional Holidays
Creating Holidays
Weather and World Building 101
Describing Fantastic Creatures
Medieval Technology
Music For Your Fantasy World
A heterogeneous World
Articles on World Building
Cliches:
Grand List of Fantasy Cliches (most of this can be debated)
Fantasy Cliches Discussion
Ten Fantasy Cliches That Should Be Put to Rest
Seven Fantasy Cliches That Need to Disappear
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches 101
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliche Meter: The Bad Guys
Fantasy Novelist’s Exam
Mary Sue Race Test
Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS
Read More

Such a useful reference

literaryglamour:

thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:

  • Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
  • Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
  • Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
  • Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
  • Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
  • Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
  • Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
  • Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
  • Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
  • Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
  • Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
  • Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
  • Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
  • High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
  • Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
  • Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
  • Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
  • Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
  • Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
  • Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
  • Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
  • Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.

Word Counts:

Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.

Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.

A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.

Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.

But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.

  • General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
  • Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
  • Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
  • YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
  • Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 

Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.

As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.

Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.

World Building:

Cliches:

Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS

Read More

Such a useful reference



storiessongsandsorcery:

This is insanely useful!

(Source: beanboots-and-bows)



148590 NOTES | Reblogged from blahdiblahrants

frosty-butt:

kyleehenke:

ihaveamicrophone:




darkoverord:




dalehan:




pwnypony:





GUYS. GUYS.
GUYS.
HOLY FUCK.
GOOD GUY ADOBE releases the ENTIRE CS2 SUITE. FOR FREE.

That means free access to Photoshop CS2 - and that already has most of what you could ask for, really.
All you have to do is create a FREE ADOBE ID.
I am not sure about commercial use, but MAN. FUCKIN’ SWEET DUDE




Reblogging for the greater good.




I’m unlikely to pick it up as I honestly never use PS anymore, but here everyone who follows me. Free stuff.




oh wow this is perfect i was just lamenting that i’d have to buy creative suite for my new laptop WELP




Signal boost for any of my followers who need art programs!
The cs2 programs date back only a few years, and still have much of the functionality of today’s more modern ones. The differences between most of the versions are little more than slight modifications or additions of minor features, and UI changes. Go for it guys!!
Also, in case the page is down, here are the download links + serials.

Signal boost for you too, I downloaded it and use Photoshop CS2 to draw now c: enjoy, this is legit!

frosty-butt:

kyleehenke:

ihaveamicrophone:

darkoverord:

dalehan:

pwnypony:

image

GUYS. GUYS.

GUYS.

HOLY FUCK.

GOOD GUY ADOBE releases the ENTIRE CS2 SUITE. FOR FREE.

image

That means free access to Photoshop CS2 - and that already has most of what you could ask for, really.

All you have to do is create a FREE ADOBE ID.

I am not sure about commercial use, but MAN. FUCKIN’ SWEET DUDE

Reblogging for the greater good.

I’m unlikely to pick it up as I honestly never use PS anymore, but here everyone who follows me. Free stuff.

oh wow this is perfect i was just lamenting that i’d have to buy creative suite for my new laptop WELP

Signal boost for any of my followers who need art programs!

The cs2 programs date back only a few years, and still have much of the functionality of today’s more modern ones. The differences between most of the versions are little more than slight modifications or additions of minor features, and UI changes. Go for it guys!!

Also, in case the page is down, here are the download links + serials.

Signal boost for you too, I downloaded it and use Photoshop CS2 to draw now c: enjoy, this is legit!



184582 NOTES | Reblogged from sciene-hwata
Tags: #drawing #reference

gryfflndor:

I’m currently obsessed with typography (!!!) so I decided to make a masterpost on it - this post includes fonts, tutorials for various text effects, guides, useful links, inspiration and (even) a couple of typographic games for your enjoyment! Have fun! :-)
Fonts

favourites: lobster, amplify, carton, mission script, hoefler text (font library), ruritania (for fancy capital letters), levibrush, didot (font library), times (font library), ranger, freshman, geared, ribbon, pompadour numerals, riotsquad, nouvelle vague
behance (free ones - scroll all the way down to find download link)
dafont 
font-source
fontsquirrel
fontfabric
fontzone
masterpost x x 
losttype

Guides 

sweettasteofbitter’s typography masterpost 
Pairing Fonts guide
7 Typography Tips 

Text Effects + Poster Design tutorials 

Aeroplane movie poster tutorial
Bagel effect
Blood effect
Chalkboard effect action
Computer chip effect
Floral effect
Geometric effect (for numbers)
Glowing neon effect 
Hand-drawn typography tutorial
Hipster effect
Ice cream effect (yummy)
Inky / splotchy effect (like my banner)
Inset effect
Multiple stokes effect
Ombre gradient effect
Ribbon behind text 
Retro badge design (x / x / x ) 
Retro poster tutorial
Retro linen effect
Road effect
Scrabble tile effect
Shading effect
Skin effect (for hannibal fans!!)
Smoky effect (or ghost-y)
Tree branch effect (creepy + cool)
Vintage grunge-y poster tutorial
Vintage effect action
Vintage tile effect
Vintage space-y poster tutorial
Watercolor effect 
3D + shadow effect action 
3D effect (quick & easy)
*MORE ÜBER COOL EFFECTS*

Other useful websites / inspiration

10 Useful Typography Websites
More typography tools
Typography Inspiration I. 
Typography Inspiration (from package designs) II.
Typography Inspiration III. aguamentea (simple but very pretty)
Typography Inspiration IV. risarodil (using Illustrator)
Typography Inspiration V. google search (your bff) 
Typography Inspiration VI.
Typography Inspiration VII. infographics (mind = blown)

Just FYI  

Typography tidbits (cool stuff)
Typography in infographics (who doesnt like infographics)
Typography crimes
Kerning game (if you have nothing better to do)
Matching Fonts game 

gryfflndor:

I’m currently obsessed with typography (!!!) so I decided to make a masterpost on it - this post includes fonts, tutorials for various text effects, guides, useful links, inspiration and (even) a couple of typographic games for your enjoyment! Have fun! :-)

Fonts

favouriteslobster, amplify, carton, mission script, hoefler text (font library), ruritania (for fancy capital letters), levibrush, didot (font library), times (font library), ranger, freshman, geared, ribbon, pompadour numerals, riotsquad, nouvelle vague

behance (free ones - scroll all the way down to find download link)

dafont 

font-source

fontsquirrel

fontfabric

fontzone

masterpost x x 

losttype

Guides 

sweettasteofbitter’s typography masterpost 

Pairing Fonts guide

7 Typography Tips 

Text Effects + Poster Design tutorials 

Aeroplane movie poster tutorial

Bagel effect

Blood effect

Chalkboard effect action

Computer chip effect

Floral effect

Geometric effect (for numbers)

Glowing neon effect 

Hand-drawn typography tutorial

Hipster effect

Ice cream effect (yummy)

Inky / splotchy effect (like my banner)

Inset effect

Multiple stokes effect

Ombre gradient effect

Ribbon behind text 

Retro badge design (x / x / x 

Retro poster tutorial

Retro linen effect

Road effect

Scrabble tile effect

Shading effect

Skin effect (for hannibal fans!!)

Smoky effect (or ghost-y)

Tree branch effect (creepy + cool)

Vintage grunge-y poster tutorial

Vintage effect action

Vintage tile effect

Vintage space-y poster tutorial

Watercolor effect 

3D + shadow effect action 

3D effect (quick & easy)

*MORE ÜBER COOL EFFECTS*

Other useful websites / inspiration

10 Useful Typography Websites

More typography tools

Typography Inspiration I. 

Typography Inspiration (from package designs) II.

Typography Inspiration III. aguamentea (simple but very pretty)

Typography Inspiration IV. risarodil (using Illustrator)

Typography Inspiration V. google search (your bff) 

Typography Inspiration VI.

Typography Inspiration VII. infographics (mind = blown)

Just FYI  

Typography tidbits (cool stuff)

Typography in infographics (who doesnt like infographics)

Typography crimes

Kerning game (if you have nothing better to do)

Matching Fonts game 



9820 NOTES | Reblogged from lucifersaam
Tags: #typing #writing #reference

Writing Resources Masterlist 

referenceforwriters:

The full list of resources RFW has reblogged or shared.

Editing Software

6836 NOTES | Reblogged from closecas

24 Invaluable Skills to Learn For Free Online in 2014 

heytherewolfgirl:

1. Become awesome at Excel. (x)

2. Learn how to code. (x) (x)

3. Make a dynamic website. (x) (x) (x)

4. Learn to make a mobile game. (x) (x)

5. Start reading faster. (x)

6. Learn a language! (x)

7. Pickle your own vegetables. (

(Source: BuzzFeed)

thedaughterofvalentine:

thelastofthemorgensterns:

olplya:

Looking for something to read post-Hunger Games? Check out this great map. Whatever it was that you liked about Hunger Games (or other dystopia/science fiction/fantasy novels), you can find here!

DYSTOPIAN HEAVEN

Praise the person who had created this post



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